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Teen Relationships

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Raising a teenager
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Raising a teen

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Don't Drop Out
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Honesty Is The Best Policy
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Life In The Blender
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Tips for parents about teenage pregnancy

As parents, we want our children to have a better future, a good education, and a promising job. However, there are certain issues that may cause a roadblock in front of your child's dream. Talking to your teenager about pregnancy may save your child's ambitions for a better future. You can't force your child to make the right decisions, but you can help prevent them from making costly mistakes. Here are some tips to help you talk to your teen about the dangers of teenage pregnancy.

  • Communicating is the key to preventing teenage pregnancy. Talk to your teen openly about sex, love, and relationships, this will get your child to trust you. Tell them you knew what it was like being a teen, and you know about the pressures of having a sexual relationship with someone.
  • Supervise your child's activities. If your child gets out of school at 3 p.m., and you come home at 6 p.m., who's responsible for their well being. You have to establish curfews, and expectations with your child on how to behave when you are not around. Supervising your kids doesn't make you nosey, it makes you a parent who cares for their child.
  • Know your children's friends and their families. As a parent, you have the right to know who your child associates with. Your child's friends have strong influences on them, so try and teach them to chose friends who share their same values. If you see your child associating with people who don't have any standards, you have the right, as a parent to step in and make a decision for your child.
  • Discourage your teen from early dating. Allowing your teen to start dating before the age of 16 can lead to trouble. Let your child know your stance on early dating, by telling them that there will be consequences if you find out they've disobeyed you.
  • Let your teenager know that dating someone older is not in their best interest. For a young girl, dating someone older may seem like the glamorous thing to do. However, pressures to have sex will greatly increase, which may cause them to stress out, forgetting about priorities such as school and family obligations.
  • Help your teen achieve his or hers goals. The chance of teenage pregnancy decreases when they are active in school, sports, or communities services. Help them set long term goals, and tell them that an early pregnancy will delay those goals. Get your teen involved in as many school and communities activities as possible, this will teach them to use their time in a productive way.
  • Encourage your kids to take school seriously. Talk to your child about the importance of getting a good education. Engage yourself in the progress of your child at school. Try and volunteer at their school by becoming a part of the P.TA .

If you follow these guidelines, you can decrease the possibility of your teen becoming a parent. Don't shy away from this very important issue because your child is depending on you to help them reach their goals.

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