Link to MamasHealth.com

Infections

Adenovirus
Anthrax
Avian Flu
Battle the Cold
Black Fever
Bronchitis

Chicken Pox
Cholera
Colds and Cruises
Cold Season
Coxsackie Virus
Croup
Cytomegalovirus
Dengue Fever
Diphtheria
Ear Infection
Ebola
Epiglottitis
Fight the Flu
Flu
Flu Vaccine
Glandular Fever
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Laryngitis
Leprosy
Lice
Lyme Disease
Mad Cow Disease
Malaria
Measles
Meningitis
Mono
Mumps
Pertussis
Pink Eye
Pinworms
Pneumonia
Polio
Rabies
Rheumataic Fever
Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
RSV
Sarcoidosis
SARS
Shigella Enteritis
Scarlet Fever
Smallpox
Sore Throat
Stomach Flu
Strep Throat
Super Infections
Swine Flu
Tetanus
Thrush
Tonsilitis
Tuberculosis
Typhoid Fever
Valley Fever
West Nile Virus
Whooping Cough
Yellow Fever

Links

Promote your product

Support Groups

 

Ah-Choo! Prepare Yourself for Cold Season

(ARA) - The sounds of winter -- the wind rustling through the trees, the cheers at football games, and, of course, coughing and sneezing! When the weather turns colder, bothersome cold viruses again run rampant.

Studies show that the average person contracts about three colds per year; and those who are in contact with young children tend to get even more. Often a cold begins with a sore throat. A runny or congested nose follows and, within a few days, a cough begins. A cold can last two or three weeks; however, most people are better within seven to 10 days.

Because colds are caused by viruses, there is no cure for the common cold. Antibiotics do not kill these viruses and can lead to resistant strains of bacteria. Prevention is the best approach to combat the cold virus; however once it’s taken hold, the best you can do is try to minimize your symptoms.

Here are a few tips to prepare you and your family for the onslaught of the cold season, which tends to run from September until March or April.

Wash Your Hands

Frequent handwashing is one of the simplest and most effective ways to keep from catching a cold. Anti-bacterial washes allow you to get the benefits of handwashing when you don’t have access to soap and water. Alcohol-based foams and gels are recommended by the Centers for Disease Control for hand hygiene.

Fall Medicine Cabinet Cleaning

Just in case you do catch a cold, make sure your medicine cabinet or first aid kit is fully stocked with current over-the-counter medications. You should examine the contents of your medicine cabinet and discard any expired medicines at least once per year. Then you’ll want to restock with a supply of cough suppressants, pain relievers and antihistamines that may provide the perfect combination to combat the symptoms of any colds you might catch this season. Keep in mind that the most convenient medicines are portable so that you can manage your symptoms even when you’re not at home. Portable medicines, such as gelcap-formulated cough suppressants mean you can get effective cough relief whenever and wherever you need it. For example, maximum strength DexAlone is a nonprescription gelcap-formulated cough suppressant that is stronger and longer lasting than some popular cough syrups. It’s available in local pharmacies and online at www.dexalone.com.

Eat Your Fruits and Veggies

Maintaining a well-balanced diet is also a cold prevention tip. Plenty of nutritious food is essential to building a healthy immune system. A well-balanced diet provides sources of energy and nutrition for optimal growth and development. Taking a daily multi-vitamin also helps ensure that you will receive an adequate dose of minerals and vitamins.

Sleeping Beauty

On average, a person needs seven to eight hours of sleep every night. Lack of sleep can lower the immune system’s ability to react when needed. Without sufficient sleep, the immune system is hard-pressed to keep up with its nightly repair work. This creates the opportunity for disease processes to begin.

These are just a few suggestions to help you and your family enjoy the fall season without a runny nose, achy head and persistent cough.

Courtesy of ARA Content

We'll teach you how to #LiveTo100!

Join our newsletter!

Accessibility Policy| Terms Of Use| Privacy Policy| Advertise with Us| Contact Us| Newsletter

RSS| Sitemap| Careers

Mamas Health Inc. does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms of Use.

©2000 - 2017 MamasHealth, Inc.™. All rights reserved