Link to MamasHealth.com

Eye Health

Amblyopia
Aniridia
Astigmatism
Bechet's Disease
Bietti's Crystalline Dystrophy
Black Eye
Blepharitis
Blepharospasm
Blood in Eye
Cataracts
Chemical Eye Burn
CMV Retinitis
Color Blindness
Contact Lenses
Contact Lenses Care
Contact Lenses Infection
Corneal Transplant
Crossed Eyes
Detached Retina
Diabetic Retinopathy
Dry Eye Syndrome
Eye
Eye focus and tear production
Eye Care
Eye Care Professionals
Eye Exam
Eye Herpes
Farsightedness
Floaters
Fuchs' Dystrophy
Glasses are Hip!
Glaucoma
Keratoconus
LASIK Checklist
LASIK Doctors
LASIK Risks
LASIK Surgery
Lattice Dystrophy
Low Vision
Macular Degeneration
Macular Hole
Macular Pucker
Map-Dot-Fingerprint
Nearsightedness
Pink Eye
Presbyopia
Protect eyesight
Pterygia
Sty
Vitreous Detachment

Links

Eyelid lift

How to use eye cosmetics safely

Dogs for the Blind
Sunglasses


Pterygium

What is Pterygium?

A pterygium is a pinkish, triangular-shaped tissue growth on the cornea. Some pterygia grow slowly throughout a person's life, while others stop growing after a certain point. It is usually not too noticeable unless it becomes red and swollen from dust or air pollutants. In rare cases, a pterygium can grow large enough so that it begins to cover the pupil of the eye.

Pterygia are more common in sunny climates and in the 20-40 age group.

What Causes Pterygia?

Scientists do not know what causes pterygia to develop. However, since people who have pterygia usually have spent a significant time outdoors, many doctors believe ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun may be a factor. In areas where sunlight is strong, wearing protective eyeglasses, sunglasses, and/or hats with brims are suggested. While some studies report a higher prevalence of pterygia in men than in women, this may reflect different rates of exposure to UV light.

Can Pterygia be Treated?

Yes. The most common treatment of pterygium is to have it removed. Surgery to remove a pterygium is not recommended unless it affects vision. If a pterygium is surgically removed, it may grow back, particularly if the patient is less than 40 years of age. Lubricants can reduce the redness and provide relief from the chronic irritation.

We'll teach you how to #LiveTo100!

Join our newsletter!

Accessibility Policy| Terms Of Use| Privacy Policy| Advertise with Us| Contact Us| Newsletter

RSS| Sitemap| Careers

Mamas Health Inc. does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms of Use.

©2000 - 2017 MamasHealth, Inc.™. All rights reserved