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Kindergarten Readiness

Is My Child Ready for Kindergarten?

Children do well if they enter kindergarten with particular skills and a general knowledge about the world around them. However, each child is individual and no child should have expectations placed on him or her that he or she is incapable of performing.

Keep in mind that each school has different expectations of kindergarten children. Contact your child’s future kindergarten school and find out what skills they would like your child to have prior to being enrolled. One school may expect a child to know his or her name and address and be able to write a few letters. Another school may have no such expectations, but expect a child to be able to use the bathroom on his or her own, or be able to button their own coat.

Signs a Child Is Ready for Kindergarten

General and Self Knowledge

  • Child is eager to learn.
  • Child knows the names of some farm and zoo animals.
  • Child knows and can identify most colors.
  • Child understands the difference between large and small, big and little, up and down, etc.
  • Child knows the parts of his or her body.
  • Child knows his or her full name, and parent’s names.

Reading and Writing Readiness

  • Child is able to sit and listen to stories.
  • Child is able to tell what is happening in a picture they view.
  • Child knows or recognizes letters.
  • Child can identify their own name when written on paper.
  • Child can scribble or draw pictures.

Speaking and Listening Readiness

  • Child can speak clearly.
  • Child is able to hold a conversation.
  • Child asks questions.
  • Child is able to answer questions that are age appropriate.
  • Child is able to follow two or three command directions.
  • Child is able to tell the difference between soft and loud sounds.
  • Child is able to identify different sounds.
  • Child is able to tell a story or repeat a story or nursery rhyme.

Motor Skill Readiness

  • Child is able to walk in a line.
  • Child can run.
  • Child can clap their hands.
  • Child can jump with both feet together forward and backwards.
  • Child can throw and catch a large ball.
  • Child can pedal a tricycle or bike with training wheels.

Fine Motor Skill Readiness

  • Child is able to open and close buttons.
  • Child can draw with a pencil.
  • Child is able to pick up small objects, such as a coin, button, or marble.
  • Child is learning to lace shoes.
  • Child can build a tower with blocks.

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