Link to MamasHealth.com

Health Books

A Doctor's Patients
A Good Fight
Age Well
Abs Workout
Back Pain
Behind the Smile
Bipolar Child
Body Blues
Breast Cancer Prevention
Calm Down
Cerebral Palsy
Cancer Schmancer
Coping with Alzheimers
Depression
Diabetes Cookbook
Eat Healthier
Eat to Live
Father-to-Be
Fatigue Relief
Fibromyalgia in Kids
Germ Handbook
Good Carb Cookbook
Healthy Life Guide
Healthy Stomach
Healthy Women
Healing Wise
Hepatitis A to G
Living Beauty
Meditate for Health
Menopause
Menopause Help
Migraines and Women
My Sister's Keeper
Obesity Myths
Optimum Health
Perimenopause
Precious Life
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Week by Week
Are you Pregnant?
Run for Health
Save your Life!
Shadow Syndromes
Slim Down Sister
South Beach Diet
Stay Young
Strengths: A Definition
Stroke Recovery
Strong Bones
The Killers Within
The Strenght Code
Thyroid Health
Viagra
Walk Strong
Women Heart Disease
Women's Bodies

Links

Promote your product

 

Short Guide to a Happy Life

by Anna Quindlen

EXCERPT

I'm not particularly qualified by profession or education to give advice and counsel. It's widely known in a small circle that I make a mean tomato sauce, and I know many inventive ways to hold a baby while nursing, although I haven't had the opportunity to use any of them in years. I have a good eye for a nice swatch and a surprising paint chip, and I have had a checkered but occasionally successful sideline in matchmaking.

But I've never earned a doctorate, or even a master's degree. I'm not an ethicist, or a philosopher, or an expert in any particular field. Each time I give a commencement speech I feel like a bit of a fraud. Yogi Berra's advice seems as good as any: When you come to a fork in the road, take it!

I can't talk about the economy, or the universe, or academe, as academicians like to call where they work when they're feeling kind of grand. I'm a novelist. My work is human nature. Real life is really all I know.

Don't ever confuse the two, your life and your work. That's what I have to say. The second is only a part of the first. Don't ever forget what a friend once wrote to Senator Paul Tsongas when the senator had decided not to run for reelection because he'd been diagnosed with cancer: "No man ever said on his deathbed I wish I had spent more time at the office."

Don't ever forget the words on a postcard that my father sent me last year: "If you win the rat race, you're still a rat."

Or what John Lennon wrote before he was gunned down in the driveway of the Dakota: "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans."

That's the only advice I can give. After all, when you look at the faces of a class of graduating seniors, you realize that each student has only one thing that no one else has. When you leave college, there are thousands of people out there with the same degree you have; when you get a job, there will be thousands of people doing what you want to do for a living.

But you are the only person alive who has sole custody of your life. Your particular life. Your entire life. Not just your life at a desk, or your life on the bus, or in the car, or at the computer. Not just the life of your mind, but the life of your heart. Not just your bank account, but your soul.

We'll teach you how to #LiveTo100!

Join our newsletter!

Accessibility Policy| Terms Of Use| Privacy Policy| Advertise with Us| Contact Us| Newsletter

RSS| Sitemap| Careers

Mamas Health Inc. does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms of Use.

©2000 - 2017 MamasHealth, Inc.™. All rights reserved