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What is Cutaneous Anthrax?

Cutaneous anthrax infections occur when the anthrax bacteriam enters the skin. The bacterium can enter the skin through a cut or abrasion. It is usually contracted through skin contact with the bacterium (spores). The usual method of contraction is through handling contaminated animal products.

Steps of Infection

The cutaneous infection begins as a tiny blister on the skin. The blister increases in size and develops a dark center. (Day One)

The blister grows and the dark area becomes larger as the infected tissue continues to decay. Swelling occurs around the blister. (About Two Days Later)

Infected area continues to grow in width and deeper into the skin. If infection is not treated, it can spread to the blood. If the blood becomes infected with anthrax, death often occurs.

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